I feel nervous posting this as there has been a lot of heat around this topic in type lately! But this article shares my story of doing the wrong thing then correcting course when building a font library.

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AuthorNicole Phillips

Emily Gosling reviews a Graphic Design Play Book: An exploration of visual thinking by Paris-based graphic designers Sophie Cure and Aurélien Farina offers up the idea of design and play in a fun new way. The book acts as both a simple introduction to the basic principles of graphic design; and a gentle, fun way for those who already design to think about their craft in newer, simpler ways.

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AuthorNicole Phillips

Since establishing Bizzarri-Rodriguez. nine years ago, Thomas and Alain have focused their practice on the book as a medium as well as the practice of typography. “It’s probably one of the most all-encompassing design exercises you can find,” explains Thomas. “Designing a book involves so much knowledge and so many different practices; it is everything except a science.” They try and learn something new every day, keeping in mind what has or hasn’t worked previously and trying out new ways of working to deliver the best possible outcomes within design.

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AuthorNicole Phillips
CategoriesBOOKS, PEOPLE

Rather than being modern interpretations where the designer leaves an obvious mark, the Commercial Classics are careful reconstructions, made not for yesterday, but for today’s users. They take the old forms, and expand them in new directions, whilst retaining the charm and beauty of the originals. This talk took place on July 8, 2019, at The Cooper Union as part of Type@Cooper's Herb Lubalin Lecture Series.

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AuthorNicole Phillips

James Edmonson of OHNO type company, has a new (work in progress) release via Future Fonts. Its incredibly fun and you can grab it now for just $9 USD. “This counterless semi-connecting script is an ode to unbridled enthusiasm and a complete disregard for the ruler tool.” James explains most of his work is scaffolded by the idea of “counterspace equals letterspace”, but when the counters get removed things feel more abstract, and with the unfamiliarity comes a different sort of impact.

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AuthorNicole Phillips
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AuthorNicole Phillips
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AuthorNicole Phillips
CategoriesFONTS, HISTORY