The Metropolitan Museum of Art revealed it is making it's collection available online for unrestricted use, in partnership with Creative Commons.

Including some fantastic examples of print and typographic history - such as 'A Tumultuous Assembly'. Numerical Sensibility (Une Assemblée tumultueuse. Sensibilité numérique) published in Les mots en liberté futuristes by Filippo Tommaso Marinetti.

A Tumultuous Assembly: Numerical Sensibility is an example of tavole parolibere (free-word pictures). In this print, the subject of which is Italy’s victory in World War I, Marinetti drew from visual collage and parole in libertà (words-in-freedom) and eschewed regulations of grammar and syntax to create a work that can be interpreted both visually and aurally. A Tumultuous Assembly: Numerical Sensibility liberates numbers, signs, letters, and images from their functional responsibilities, exaggerates forms, and juxtaposes diverse elements, thereby producing unexpected associations. The Futurists celebrated the potential of war, drawing analogies between weaponry, such as torpedoes and bombs, and Futurist poetry. Here, Marinetti combined innovative typography, found elements (such as the image of the drummer boy on the left and the strips of letters and numbers throughout the composition), and dramatic variations in scale to create a dynamic composition representing a celebrating crowd.

A Tumultuous Assembly: Numerical Sensibility is an example of tavole parolibere (free-word pictures). In this print, the subject of which is Italy’s victory in World War I, Marinetti drew from visual collage and parole in libertà (words-in-freedom) and eschewed regulations of grammar and syntax to create a work that can be interpreted both visually and aurally. A Tumultuous Assembly: Numerical Sensibility liberates numbers, signs, letters, and images from their functional responsibilities, exaggerates forms, and juxtaposes diverse elements, thereby producing unexpected associations. The Futurists celebrated the potential of war, drawing analogies between weaponry, such as torpedoes and bombs, and Futurist poetry. Here, Marinetti combined innovative typography, found elements (such as the image of the drummer boy on the left and the strips of letters and numbers throughout the composition), and dramatic variations in scale to create a dynamic composition representing a celebrating crowd.

 

Creative Commons CEO Ryan Merkley called it “a huge deal”. In a statement, director of the Met Thomas P. Campbell said: “Our core mission is to be open and accessible for all who wish to study and enjoy the works of art in our care.” The collection “spans 5,000 years of world culture” and, with this new venture, Campbell said the aim is to serve “the interests and needs of our 21st-century audiences.”

Campbell claims, with the digital move, the museum “now becomes the largest and most diverse open-access museum collection in the world.”

Museums like Copenhagen’s National Gallery of Denmark and the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam already have their collections online in a similar way. Check out the Met's collection here.