The latest edition of Jen Farrell (aka Starshaped press)’s weekend Printer encourages us all not to be complacent with arbitrary values (& trying to speed up an inherently slow process). “I know it’s fun to throw a bunch of big, juicy wood type on a Vandercook, slap some magnets down and go to town with it. I am often asked how I turn out a lot of work in a short period of time and it’s because I DON’T do that. What seems like the fast way is anything but, and if you want to learn a few tips to do it right, read on.”

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AuthorNicole Phillips
Posted
AuthorNicole Phillips

I always love seeing the diverse quality produced by the TypeMedia graduates. Their class of 2018 microsite is live and it does’nt dissapoint with loads of terrific typefaces on offer. My favourite (although it was tricky to choose!) is Zrinka Buljubašić’s Dalma which is a “reinterpretation of contradictory movements of the sea such as static and dynamic, sturdy and delicate, elegant and raw, wild and calm”

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AuthorNicole Phillips

An 81 year old artisan printer is seeking an heir to inherit his business in an effort to revive the fortunes of the letterpress printing trade after his children decided to pursue different careers. Stanley Lane has worked as a ‘monotype’ hand printer for over 60 years, producing meticulously crafted books from Gloucester Typesetting workshop in Stroud to a select group of publishers.

I think the Better Letters events are phenomenal and am so excited to see they are selling the Mike Meyer’s workshop resources as merch. The poster series is fantastic but I am most excited by this A5 booklet showing stroke sequence and spacing for a variety of sign painting styles. The 12-page booklet contains: Block (upper and lower case); Thick & Thin; Casual; Slanted Casual; Script (upper and lower case). It also includes reference pages for spacing, shadows and convex bevels.

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AuthorNicole Phillips

Tasman‘s shape grammar has gravity and power that speaks to truth, reliability or perhaps more aptly trustworthiness. These are fundamental qualities in the delivery of information in an "alternative fact" age.

In this practical antidote to a “quit your job and do what you love” talk, Jess unpacks the question — “What do you want to be when you grow up?”— and the importance of finding out who you are in the first place. She notes the answer to “Who am I?” is never static — it shifts and transforms over and over again as you grow, change, mature, hormonally implode, and so on. Only once you know yourself, discover what actually makes you tick, can you “do what you love.”

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AuthorNicole Phillips