There is a small scrapbook in the original W.A. Dwiggins Collection at the Boston Public Library. Among its miscellaneous contents are five small sheets of paper bearing undated outline drawings of rotunda alphabets. Paul Shaw deep dives into the provinance of these important and lovely sketched letters.

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AuthorNicole Phillips

In this practical antidote to a “quit your job and do what you love” talk, Jess unpacks the question — “What do you want to be when you grow up?”— and the importance of finding out who you are in the first place. She notes the answer to “Who am I?” is never static — it shifts and transforms over and over again as you grow, change, mature, hormonally implode, and so on. Only once you know yourself, discover what actually makes you tick, can you “do what you love.”

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AuthorNicole Phillips
Posted
AuthorNicole Phillips

These street name signs 'hide in plain sight' they are read daily for navigation as visual wayfinding anchors but not often seen. Especially by locals, Allistair’s project is about looking at these signs critically to understand where they have come from and what narrative they may tell of his city.

Amsterdam-based artist and illustrator Karan Singh and New York-based graphic designer Zuzanna Rogatty, explored the bonfire night, where fireworks are lit and crowds gather to marvel. Prior to the project, Karan had been drawn to Zuzanna’s work for its forms “so full of character”, particularly within her typographic work where the designer transforms any old letterform into a fluid, bold vector of wonder. With Zuzanna an equal fan of Karan’s brightly composed patterned work, the pair set to work.

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AuthorNicole Phillips
CategoriesART, LETTERING

The prolific Penguin designer’s site showcases a portfolio of print design and lettering that is exemplary. This is a fantastic resource of inspiration for us all to up our editorial design, critical thinking and lettering games. David Pearson writes “Jerry’s work has always resonated with me; not simply because of its precise nature but also because Jerry never forgets to have fun. His title-page spreads for the Pelican History of Art series are a perfect example – marrying the rigour of Swiss Modernism with a freedom of expression that is uniquely Jerry’s."