Fontself partnered with Francis Chouquet and Daniel Hosoya to bring you super-packed creative advice to help you up-your type craftsmanship. They synthesized their top recommendations & illustrated them as part of two new articles on the fontself blog: The first entitled ‘How to draw better letters for your fonts’ and the second builds on this wisdom with tips for consistency in ‘How to design a typeface system‘. (Use these tips to develop your own typeface with Fontself like I did here)

Hightype is a type foundry strictly for three-dimensions, founded by Manuel Rossner in Berlin last month. At the moment, its two main purposes consist of lowpoly-models for games and websites as well as smoother versions for print and video. Manuel tells It’s Nice That: “Its possible applications are promising, ranging from VR typography games to augmented reality to interactive websites and high-resolution brand imagery.”

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AuthorNicole Phillips
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AuthorNicole Phillips
CategoriesTECHNOLOGY

Check out this incredible Animation created for Richard Ardagh’s talk on Monotype punchcutting at the Printing Museums conference in Belgium. The face of this steel punch measures 0.2 inches (approx 5mm) square and you see the approx 30 stages of the engraving process. This ct ligature is from Hungry Dutch, a font by Russell Maret

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AuthorNicole Phillips

The baseline is one of the foundations of legibility, allowing letters to be read in a flowing fashion along a horizontal line our minds construct. So how did type foundries keep a consistent baseline? They did not. At least for most of the first four and a half centuries of printing before industrial scale had fully set in and before standardization became keenly important as an element of efficiency and productivity. Read this fascinating article from Glenn Fleishman for more.

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AuthorNicole Phillips
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AuthorNicole Phillips
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AuthorNicole Phillips

Canadian Gerald McGoey was judged to have falsified documents in an attempt to protect certain assets from bankruptcy proceedings because—the documents used Microsoft's Calibri & Cambria fonts, which didn't become widely available until 2007. This would have been fine were it not for the minor detail that the documents were dated 2004 and 1995.

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AuthorNicole Phillips
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AuthorNicole Phillips
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AuthorNicole Phillips