The baseline is one of the foundations of legibility, allowing letters to be read in a flowing fashion along a horizontal line our minds construct. So how did type foundries keep a consistent baseline? They did not. At least for most of the first four and a half centuries of printing before industrial scale had fully set in and before standardization became keenly important as an element of efficiency and productivity. Read this fascinating article from Glenn Fleishman for more.

Posted
AuthorNicole Phillips

I think the Better Letters events are phenomenal and am so excited to see they are selling the Mike Meyer’s workshop resources as merch. The poster series is fantastic but I am most excited by this A5 booklet showing stroke sequence and spacing for a variety of sign painting styles. The 12-page booklet contains: Block (upper and lower case); Thick & Thin; Casual; Slanted Casual; Script (upper and lower case). It also includes reference pages for spacing, shadows and convex bevels.

Posted
AuthorNicole Phillips
Posted
AuthorNicole Phillips

Narrow and straight-sided, Aglet Sans playfully exploits a system of angles and corner radiuses to arrive at a vocabulary of shapes that becomes more diverse and intriguing as it grows more substantial in weight and provides a dynamism that offsets the strictures of other forms, urging the eye forward. I spoke with Designer Jesse Ragan to learn more

The issue includes ‘Type Now’ (with articles by Jan Middendorp, Sarah Snaith and Peter Biľak on three burning issues in contemporary type); an article about the late Bram de Does; Ferdinand Ulrich visits the living archive that is Rainer Gerstenberg’s foundry in Darmstadt and Paul Barnes’s excavation of the St Bride ‘treasure trove’ that inspired Commercial Classics. Eye Before You Buy’ the special issue here

In awe of the powerful work included in the Present Tense: Wāhine Toi Aotearoa initiative, my submission was 'Reform Required’ calling for us to all do better, & to stop placing people in rigid silos of gender, faith and ethnicity to create space for everyone to succeed.

View online or RAMP Gallery, Kirikiriroa, April 30 – May 24, 2019

Thanks to Catherine Griffiths, Alice Connew & Katie Kerr for their sweat equity and intelligence propelling #designersspeak(up)